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GRI G4 Content Index 2014

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GRI G4 Content Index 2014

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GRI G4 Content Index 2014

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GRI G4 Content Index 2014

GRI G4 Content Index 2014

The following information systematically presents all of the aspects and indicators according to the 'Core' option pursuant to the internationally recognized Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines (GRI) G4 system. Each '+' will take you to specific information and data.


General Standard Disclosures

Strategy and Analysis

G4-1

Statement from the most senior decision‑maker of the organization


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 6

Letter from the CEO & CSO

Dear Stakeholders,

In 2014 we aligned our business into three market segments: Sensory Ingredients, Fragrance Ingredients and Performance Specialties. By integrating products from all our facilities into a more cohesive framework, we are more effective in collaborating with customers on product formulations and applications. The new commercial structure helps build our own expertise and allows us to provide each industry we serve with tailored – and timely – solutions.

We made solid progress in delivering on this customer-driven approach. Performance Specialties’ strategy include expanded product functionality so customers can benefit from new uses of our varied solutions. At our newly opened Sensory Ingredients laboratory we are demonstrating the effectiveness of our products in practical applications. We intensified our commitment to Fragrance Ingredients through closer alliances with customers, ongoing innovation and delivery of high quality products made from natural, renewable feedstocks. We further strengthened global customer opportunities by obtaining several food safety certifications.

Our internal emphasis continues to be on ensuring excellence in all our activities. We expanded corporate-level integration so we maintain unified control of community relations, raw material sourcing, operations, regulatory compliance, finance, health, safety and environmental responsibility. We have focused on supply chain improvements to ensure customer satisfaction and initiated several safety programs to foster employee and contractor awareness and reporting. Waste reduction and wastewater treatment are two areas in which we advanced significantly in 2014.

We are very proud that in 2014 Pinova Inc. and Renessenz LLC were certified under the American Chemistry Council’s Responsible Care RC14001 Management System. Our Brunswick facility received ISO 9001 certification, so now all of our facilities conform to the same standard. Additionally, both companies received audit approval from SEDEX, an organization supporting supply chain responsibility.

The integration of our resources into target market segments is an evolutionary process that places us firmly on the road to sustainable success. We are creating value with every step as we reinforce our responsiveness to and engagement with customers, improve product quality and reliability, undertake high impact safety and environmental initiatives, and build a culture based on commitment and accountability. Our focus in 2015 and beyond will be on fortifying our competitive advantages and reinforcing mutually-beneficial bonds with our stakeholders.
 


Organizational Profile

G4-3

Name of the organization


Pinova Holdings, Inc.


G4-5

Location of the organization’s headquarters


2801 Cook Street, Brunswick, GA 31520, U.S.A.


G4-6

Number of countries where the organization operates


Sales in over 100 countries with major operations in the U.S.


G4-7

Nature of ownership and legal form


Torquest Partners, a Canadian equity firm, is Pinova Holdings, Inc.’s major stakeholder.

Pinova Holdings consists of two operating entities, Pinova and Renessenz.


G4-8

Markets served


Pinova Holdings, Inc. serves customers in three customer driven markets worldwide:

  • Fragrance Ingredients
  • Sensory Ingredients
  • Performance Specialties

G4-9

Scale of the reporting organization


With three production facilities in the U.S. and offices in Europe, South America, and Asia, Pinova Holdings employs 410 workers. Between our two operating entities, we offer 115 different products. We are a privately held company, therefore net sales and capitalization figures are proprietary information.


G4-10

Total workforce by employment type and region broken down by gender


Combined Report for Pinova Holdings

 

US

Europe

Asia

S. America

Total

Male

335

1

1

1

338

Female

68

4

0

0

72

Total

403

5

1

1

410

 

Hourly

Salary

Non-exempt

 

 

Male

117

109

112

 

 

Female

7

58

7

 

 


G4-11

Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements


35% of Pinova Holdings’ workforce is represented by the International Chemical Workers Union Council Local Union No. 852-CICWU/UFCW in 2014.


G4-12

Organization’s supply chain


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 13

Our supply chain transforms natural resources into specialty finished products. We engage over 1,000 suppliers of raw materials, maintenance, repair and operations, as well as service providers. Thirty five percent of our total expenditures are on local suppliers within a 100 mile radius of our manufacturing locations. Our products are used in adhesive, construction, food and beverage, personal care, fine fragrances, and agricultural products.

As we grow our customer relationships, it is increasingly important to have continued access to a stable and economically competitive supply of our raw materials. We ensure this by diversifying our supply base and arranging contracts with several new suppliers in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world. Moreover, we have a dedicated research team investigating a variety of new natural raw materials to complement our current portfolio. To affirm supplier sustainability, we require complete documentation attesting to the supplier’s safety record, environmental commitment and adherence to regulations, legislation and national and global standards.


G4-13

Significant changes during the reporting period regarding the organization’s size, structure, ownership, or its supply chain


None


G4-14

Whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization


Not applicable


G4-15

List externally developed economic, environmental and social charters, principles, or other initiatives


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 12

Assuring Food Safety

It is essential to customers that our flavor and fragrance ingredients, as well as the adhesives that are used in food packaging, are produced in as safe a way as possible.

Four more of our Sensory Ingredients products obtained Food Safety System Certification (FSSC) 22000 in 2014. FSSC 22000 is a framework for managing food safety that is fully recognized by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) and is based on International Organization for Standardization Standards (ISO). The four products were Anethole Extra, L-Carvone, Carvacrol and Gamma Terpinene. They join Winsense™ WS-3 and Menthyl Lactate in being FSSC 22000 certified. Our other food products, although not formally certified, also meet prescribed FSSC standards.

We received FAMI-QS certification for two of our sensory products in 2014, as well. FAMI-QS is the Quality and Safety System for Specialty Feed Ingredients and their Mixtures. In addition to compliance with American Feed Industry Association standards, our Anethole Extra and Carvacrol are now approved for use as animal feed additives in Europe and anywhere in the world where these high standards are required.

To assure our food safety processes, we have independent third-parties conduct annual surveillance audits. All of our plants have a Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan for food products and comply with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).

Our Brunswick, Georgia food manufacturing, packaging, warehousing and shipping operations are registered to the SQF 2000 – Level 2 (GFSI) food safety standard. Additionally, these food operations are licensed and inspected by the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) licensing and inspection agency for the state of Georgia. This means our customers can be assured they are receiving safe food ingredients.


G4-16

List memberships of associations


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 21

American Association of Candy Technologists Organization (AACTC)
American Chemistry Council (ACC)
Asphalt Emulsion Manufacturers Association (AEMA)
Asociación Nacional de Fabricantes de Productos Aromáticos (ANFPA)
Chemical Sources Association (CSA)
Brunswick-Glynn County Economic Development Authority (BGCDA)
Brunswick-Glynn County Chamber of Commerce
First Coast Manufacturing Association (FCMA)
Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA)
Georgia Chamber of Commerce
International Chewing Gum Association (ICGA)
International Federation of Essential Oils and Aroma Trade (IFEAT)
International Food Additives Council (IFAC)
International Fragrance Association North America (IFRA)
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
Manufacturers Association of Florida (MAF)
Pennsylvania Manufacturing Confectioners’ Association (PMCA)
Pine Chemicals Association (PCA)
The National Association of Flavors and Food-Ingredients Systems (NAFFS)
Research Institute of Fragrance Materials (RIFM)

We are active with local, state and federal governments and in organizations including the Brunswick-Glynn County Chamber of  Commerce, Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, Georgia Chamber of Commerce, Brunswick-Glynn County Economic Development Authority, the First Coast Manufacturing Association and the Manufacturing Association of Florida.

In collaboration with these entities we are helping to create stronger, safer, sustainable communities. We participate with them in local Employer Committee teams to enhance external interaction and add value in our region.


Identified Material Aspects & Boundaries

G4-17

List all entities included in the organization’s consolidated financial statements or equivalent documents


Pinova Holdings Inc. operates as two legal entities, Pinova, Inc. and Renessenz, LLC. All our results include both companies unless otherwise indicated.


G4-18

Process for defining the report content and the Aspect Boundaries


To determine the report content and most material aspects, our senior executives analyzed the intersection of our business strategy with sustainability topics of concern to the chemicals industry and our primary stakeholder groups. They, in collaboration with the Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO), agreed upon our material priorities: alignment with customer needs, advanced innovation, sustainable raw materials supplies, compliance, operational excellence, safety, environmental stewardship, employee development, and community relations.

The Sustainability Team then matched these interests with the GRI Categories and Aspects and selected the ones that were most material to our company and therefore most appropriate for inclusion in our report. The Sustainability Team obtained input from representatives of functional areas that reflected the priorities identified by senior management: Commercial, Communications, Human Resources, Community Relations, Operations, Sourcing and Environment, Health and Safety.


G4-19

List all of the material aspects identified in the process for defining report content


We identified the following material aspects:

• Economic performance
• Procurement practices
• Energy
• Water
• Biodiversity
• Emissions
• Effluents and waste
• Products and services
• Employment
• Occupational health and safety
• Training and education
• Diversity and equal opportunity
• Local communities
• Anti-corruption
• Customer health and safety
• Product service and labeling
• Marketing communications
• Compliance


G4-20

Process for defining the report content and aspect boundaries within/outside the organization


All the material aspects identified and listed above in G4-19 are of concern and affect our primary internal and external stakeholders.


G4-21

Process for defining the report content and aspect boundaries within/outside the organization


All the material aspects identified and listed above in G4-19 are of concern and affect our primary internal and external stakeholders.


G4-22

The effect of any restatements of information provided in previous reports, and the reasons for such restatement


None


G4-23

Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the Scope and Aspect Boundaries


None


Stakeholder Engagement

G4-24

List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization


• Customers
• Employees
• Suppliers
• Communities
• Government officials
• Industry peers


G4-25

Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage


In 2014 we initiated a new business structure that aligns with market opportunities. We identified key stakeholders for engagement during management discussions throughout our business alignment process.


G4-26

Approaches to stakeholder engagement


Customers – Our market-driven focus has resulted in deeper and more frequent discussions with customers, which occur on an ongoing basis. We are members of SEDEX, a non-profit organization dedicated to driving improvements in responsible and ethical business practices in global supply chains. Our participation furthers transparency and demonstrates our sustainability commitment to customers that access the SEDEX database. We respond to customer sustainability questionnaires throughout the year and our commercial, service and innovation teams interact with customers regularly.

Employees – The leaders of each functional area have primary responsibility for ongoing engagement with their teams. This is supplemented with periodic communication from our senior leadership via our intranet, video monitors and full staff meetings.

Suppliers – Nearly 100% of our raw materials are derived from natural, biorenewable material. Our ongoing relationships include education on how to capture the full value of these materials; monitoring related production efficiencies; and exploration of new sources of strategic materials. With existing and new suppliers we conduct periodic audits and/or require completion of a self-assessment.

Communities, government officials and industry peers – We have consolidated our community engagement activities under the corporate umbrella in order to have a more consistent and effective approach for all our production locations. Dedicated staff is responsible for ongoing participation in government and local business meetings as well as interaction with community leaders and non-profit organizations. Several employees serve on the boards of non-profits as well as industry associations. We are especially active in the International Fragrance Association, Pine Chemicals Association and American Association of Candy Technologists. Economic development, job opportunities and education are among the topics highlighted by these groups.


G4-27

Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement


Customer priorities include product quality and reliability, innovation, responsible labor and environmental practices, and compliance with regulatory, legislative and safety standards. In addition to developing sustainability reports every year since 2011, we demonstrate our commitment through our memberships in the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care® program and SEDEX, and our ISO certifications.

Employees express interest in our financial performance, their personal opportunities to progress professionally, and our company’s concern for safety and maintenance of high standards. We have affirmed the rigor of our practices as members of the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care® program and as recipients of several ISO certifications.

Suppliers consider sustainability essential to their success and ours, given that our products come from natural, renewable feedstocks. We partner with suppliers to maximize recovery of strategic materials which would otherwise be considered waste and help them identify sourcing and production opportunities.

Communities, government officials and industry peers are concerned about our economic, social and environmental impacts. We address these concerns through significant participation in a range of activities (described in G4-26) and our annual sustainability reporting.


Report Profile

G4-28

Reporting period


Calendar year 2014


G4-29

Date of most recent previous report


2013


G4-30

Reporting cycle


Annual


G4-31

Contact point for questions


G4-32

GRI Content Index


Core


G4-33

External assurance for the report


None


Governance

G4-34

Governance structure of the organization


The Pinova Holdings board of directors has ultimate decision-making authority and is responsible for oversight and appointment of officers of the corporation. The board’s executive chair is responsible for mutual communication with stakeholders.

The board’s Audit Committee monitors financial performance, conflicts of interest, privacy, corruption, anti-trust and similar issues. The Compensation Committee sets objectives and pay-for-performance compensation plans for corporate executives. The Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) Committee monitors the policies, initiatives and key metrics critical to a healthy and safe work environment and a compliant and sound environmental program. Pinova Holding’s CEO and Chief Sustainability Officer report on environmental and social progress to the HSE Committee on a quarterly basis.


Ethics & Integrity

G4-56

Organization’s values, principles, standards and norms of behavior
such as codes of conduct and codes of ethics


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 4, 5

Each of our companies has a code of conduct. All employees receive a copy of this code upon initiation of employment.

Our Business

Pinova Holdings, Inc. is a global leader in specialty chemicals, flavors and fragrances. We use natural, renewable feedstocks for all of our products which are used in a broad array of markets and applications by customers in over 100 countries. We are organized around three customer-focused markets. Our companies have a rich history in manufacturing and innovation for over 100 years.

Our Mission

Building on a heritage of innovation, we create sustainable value for our customers through the supply of specialty ingredients and performance chemicals derived from natural and renewable raw materials.

Our Vision

To be the first preference for fragrance ingredients, sensory ingredients and performance chemicals from naturally derived feedstocks.

Our Values

Customer – relationship
We strive to provide a consistent level of quality service to all customers
• We foster close, long-term customer relationships
• We do business by collaborating, not just supplying products

Team – competitive advantage
We recognize teamwork as our competitive advantage in the global market
• Our teamwork provides opportunities for growth and development
• We take collective ownership for the success of our business
• Employees are encouraged to contribute new ideas and drive their implementation
• We enable our employees and actively promote highly productive teams

Responsibility – doing the right thing
We strive to act responsibly in all aspects of our business to 'do the right thing'
• Our Health, Safety & Environmental standards are never negotiable
• We are responsible stewards of our environment and communities
• We are individually accountable for our actions and results
• We strive to earn and maintain the trust of our stakeholders

Integrity – ethical practice
We maintain the highest ethical standards and integrity
• Our work place is built on openness and honesty
• Ethical practices create pride in our company and its employees
• Operational integrity is the cornerstone of our market reputation
• We respect and treat all stakeholders fairly

Innovation – nurturing new ideas
Our team creates new products, processes and services that provide sustainable value
• Our customers and stakeholders rely on us for next step products and processes
• We recognize and reward creativity, curiosity and reasoned risk-taking
• We strive for speed to deliver a business edge to us and our customers
• We recognize discovery can occur anywhere within our organization

Performance – drive to succeed
We focus on the issues that provide market and customer value
• We practice and promote a performance driven culture
• We insist on high performance levels to maintain our competitive position
• We respond to our customers’ performance objectives with effective solutions

Quality – operational excellence
The quality of our products, processes and services is a primary objective
• We are committed to excellence at all levels
• We work closely with suppliers to maximize their contributions
• Our quality commitment extends to all aspects of the product life cycle
• We continuously improve our manufacturing efficiency through process innovation

 


Specific Standard Disclosures (Economic)

Economic Performance

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 7, 11

Aligning with Customer Values
Customers value suppliers with deep market knowledge and a spectrum of innovative solutions. They are conscientious about assessing supplier sustainability and appreciate that our products are derived from renewable resources. They seek high performance from partners dedicated to helping them grow their enterprises. Meeting these expectations and enabling our customers to satisfy shifts in market preferences, are the basis of our business strategy.

Partners for Growth
As a true business partner, we are dedicated to finding solutions that enable customers to capitalize on market trends, expand their product lines, and implement new technologies and processes. By creating tailored products and demonstrating how our ingredients work in tandem with theirs, our relationships with long-term customers continue to evolve and flourish. Current and new customers alike benefit from our global scope, process enhancements, increased capacity and dependable product quality – all of which are the foundation for greater teamwork and cooperation.


G4-EC2

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 13

Our raw materials come from renewable sources that are potentially vulnerable to climate change influences. We are diversifying our supplier base so we source from regions around the worldwide – thereby minimizing risk of a supply issue related to climatic conditions. We often establish long-term contracts to better manage the financial implications of any major shift in weather.

We continually explore new technologies that will increase feedstock yields and reduce our environmental impact. Some of our strategic raw materials add specific benefits to the environment. For example, we eliminate waste by using citrus peels and we extract pine stumps from land that can then be used for agriculture or reforestation. Our clearance of land helps increase the food supply and reduce CO2 emissions.

Transparent Partnerships

In 2014, independent auditors conducted a SEDEX Members Ethical Trade Audit at our facilities. They determined that we met SEDEX’s requirements for acceptable labor standards. Our Brunswick plant was recognized beyond the audit for several environmental initiatives: self-generation of 30 percent of its electricity and 100 percent of its steam requirements from wood chips; water consumption reductions of an estimated 25 percent in 2014 and a further 35 percent in 2015; and an entrepreneurial venture that is expected to reduce waste going to landfill by over 85 percent in 2015.


Procurement Practices

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 13

Menthol obtained from natural and synthetic mint oils to enhance flavors and fragrances.


G4-EC9

The percentage of the procurement budget used for significant locations of operation spent on suppliers local to that operation


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 21

Our three facilities in southeast Georgia and northeast Florida are significant contributors to our areas’ economies. We employ over 400 people and spend over 35 percent of our budget for purchased services on local Glynn County, Georgia and Duval County, Florida vendors.


Specific Standard Disclosures (Environmental)

Energy

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 18

Operational Excellence
At our Brunswick, Georgia plant we took a significant step toward greater operational effectiveness by reducing the number of control rooms from twelve to five, and merging four of the five control rooms into a single location. We developed written procedures including Management of Change standards and conducted intensive operator training programs prior to implementation. The new control room, which became fully functional in early 2015, gives operators wide visibility into how the processes they manage affect others and our company’s entire supply chain.

Additional investments at Brunswick were geared to increasing customer satisfaction. We formed a Supply Chain Improvement Team which is tasked with reducing off-specification production and improving packaging. To minimize damage to our products while shipping, the team began investigating use of different pallets and drums. They are working on improved forecasting and inventory management systems, and a team member was put in charge of the off-site warehouse which replaced our multiple storage facilities. Our other facilities are undertaking similar procedures to ensure best practices in everything we do.

In Jacksonville, we are increasing our in-house capacity for coolant production by approximately 35 percent, an initiative we expect to complete in 2015. The expansion will enable us to eliminate outsourced coolant production and avoid unnecessary shipping risk. The installation of new, improved performance storage tanks will help control odor emissions.


G4-EN3

Energy consumption within the organization


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 19

At Pinova, the pine wood processed is used as fuel to generate 100% of the steam required by the facility and 60% of the electrical demand. Both businesses purchase natural gas and electricity in long term supply agreements.

Total fuel consumption
Natural gas = 1,797,077 GJ

Total fuel consumption from renewable sources
Renewable Biomass Sources = 3,230,635 GJ

Energy consumption:
Purchased electricity = 334,913 GJ
Generated electricity = 53,354 GJ

Total energy consumption = 388,267 GJ

Methodology: bills and meter readings


Water

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 18

Operational Excellence
At our Brunswick, Georgia plant we took a significant step toward greater operational effectiveness by reducing the number of control rooms from twelve to five, and merging four of the five control rooms into a single location. We developed written procedures including Management of Change standards and conducted intensive operator training programs prior to implementation. The new control room, which became fully functional in early 2015, gives operators wide visibility into how the processes they manage affect others and our company’s entire supply chain.

Additional investments at Brunswick were geared to increasing customer satisfaction. We formed a Supply Chain Improvement Team which is tasked with reducing off-specification production and improving packaging. To minimize damage to our products while shipping, the team began investigating use of different pallets and drums. They are working on improved forecasting and inventory management systems, and a team member was put in charge of the off-site warehouse which replaced our multiple storage facilities. Our other facilities are undertaking similar procedures to ensure best practices in everything we do.

In Jacksonville, we are increasing our in-house capacity for coolant production by approximately 35 percent, an initiative we expect to complete in 2015. The expansion will enable us to eliminate outsourced coolant production and avoid unnecessary shipping risk. The installation of new, improved performance storage tanks will help control odor emissions.


G4-EN8

Total water withdrawal by source


Water withdrawal by source:
Surface water = 0
Ground water = 7,836,407m3
Rainwater collected = 0
Waste water from another organization = 0
Municipal water = 38,142m3
Total water withdrawal: 7,874,549m3

Water usage at the Colonels Island facility has been in decline since 2012.
Jacksonville had an increase in 2014 due to increase in production.

Methodology: Ground water meters used and city water bills.


G4-EN9

Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 19

On-site groundwater from the Upper Floridan Aquifer is our primary water source.
Our initiatives to limit withdrawal have led to a four year decline in our water consumption.


Biodiversity

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 21

With local leaders we are determining mutual goals and identifying ways to ensure that we have the most beneficial social impact on community stakeholders. We are committed to adhere to the American Chemistry Council’s Responsible Care Guiding Principles which demonstrates our concern for environmental and safety responsibility and monitoring.


G4-EN11

Location and size of protected areas and areas of high biodiversity
value outside protected areas


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 18

Pinova Inc.’s 153 acre manufacturing and office facility is located on an incline immediately above the Terry and Dupree Creeks Estuary, part of the Cumberland-St. Simmons Watershed. We are especially conscientious about water discharge in this area because the estuary is a sensitive area for fish populations.

For years, in order to purify the small amount of contaminated water generated by our Jacksonville plant, we had to remove some 10 million gallons of underground water. The process was highly inefficient given that less than half of one percent of this water needed to be treated. Our goal – to leave clean water underground – led to testing an oxygen pumping system that had the potential to treat contaminated water while it was still in the ground, so no water would be extracted. The test proved effective and we plan to implement the process in 2015.


Emissions

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 14

RESPONSIBLE CARE® RC 14001 CERTIFICATION

Both of Pinova Holdings’operating companies – Renessenz LLC and Pinova Inc. – were certified to the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care RC 14001 Certification in 2014. Representing another aspect of our commitment to quality, innovation, growth and sustainability, management of our operations in accordance with the Guiding Principles of Responsible Care adds value to customers as well as employees, the community, the environment and shareholders.

RC 14001 Responsible Care broadens the scope of the ISO 14001 standard beyond the traditional Environmental Management System to include health, safety, environmental, and security. All our facilities were dual certified to both RC 14001 and ISO 14001.


G4-EN15

Direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions - (Scope 1)


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 19

Base year = 2012

Direct emissions (Scope 1) = 95,941 MT
Gasses included in calculation = CO2, CH4, N2O
Indirect emissions (Scope 2) = 56,040 MT

Emissions increased due to more natural gas burning compared to previous years.

Methods/assumptions = did not count Biomass CO2. Used metered numbers for natural gas usage and EPA calculations for GHG emissions. Used ACC standards to calculate Scope 2 emissions.

Pinova does not track the source of emission factors and does not use a consolidation approach for emissions.


G4-EN18

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity


2.1 Mt of GHG/MT of production (Scope 1)
CO2 eq, N2O, CH4 (only in burning of NG)


G4-EN21

NOx, SOx and other significant air emissions


NOx = 0.3 KTon
SOx = 0.7 KTon
VOC = 0.04 KTon
PM = 0.02 KTon
HAP < 0.1 KTon


Effluents and Waste

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 18, 19

Operational Excellence

In Jacksonville, we are increasing our in-house capacity for coolant production by approximately 35 percent, an initiative we expect to complete in 2015. The expansion will enable us to eliminate outsourced coolant production and avoid unnecessary shipping risk. The installation of new, improved performance storage tanks will help control odor emissions.

Capturing Value from Waste

Our Brunswick operation extracts rosin and oils from pine tree stumps that still carry brown dirt from the ground when they arrive at our plant. In an effort to recycle 100 percent of the brown dirt, we found an innovative solution in partnership with an area business that manufactures mulch, top soils and potting soil.

We are now providing that company with our brown dirt waste, which they screen to recover and return any usable stump wood chip to us. They then blend the dirt so it can be sold as part of their mixtures. In addition to avoiding waste and capturing additional rosin, the relationship saves shipping and handling costs.

Our venture partner converted an abandoned property adjoining ours for this addition to its business. They turned the site from a visual eyesore into a productive enterprise contributing to the economic development of our community.


G4-EN22

Total water discharge by quality and destination


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 18 (second paragraph)

Wastewater treatment was a 2014 priority for improvement.

At our Colonels Island facility we activated an upgraded wastewater treatment plant that includes an above ground tank and a centrifuge to process waste. The changes comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements and are anticipated to reduce the amount of waste we send to landfills by 60–70 percent.

Water discharge:
1,788,837 m3 to POTW
62,620 m3 to Land Application
445,454 m3 to surface water
Method: estimation, meter readings

An increase in our production led to increase in water discharge. The Brunswick and Colonels Island facilities have a surface water discharge for non-process, non-contact wastewaters. Colonels Island uses a Land Application system. The Jacksonville facility sends all wastewater to a publicly owned treatment works (POTW).

TSS = <150 Ton
BOD = <275 Ton


G4-EN24

Total number and volume of significant spills


None


Products and Services

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 7

Aligning with Customer Values
Customers value suppliers with deep market knowledge and a spectrum of innovative solutions. They are conscientious about assessing supplier sustainability and appreciate that our products are derived from renewable resources. They seek high performance from partners dedicated to helping them grow their enterprises. Meeting these expectations and enabling our customers to satisfy shifts in market preferences, are the basis of our business strategy.


G4-EN27

Extent of impact mitigation of environmental impacts of products and services


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 18, 19

Environmental Sustainability

Our environmental strategy builds on a cradle-to-grave model of making efficient use of every material that comes into our plants and that is generated as a manufacturing by-product. We constantly seek new uses for waste, which has led us to repurpose much of this material. In Brunswick, for example, wood sawdust and chip waste is used to meet 100 percent of the facility’s steam requirement and 30 percent of its electricity needs. The facility also takes advantage of the dirt removed from the tree stumps we harvest by delivering it to a local entrepreneur who applies it in his mulch and soil business.


Specific Standard Disclosures (Social)

Labour Practices and Decent Work

(Sub-category)


Employment

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 13, 20

Transparent Partnerships

In 2014, independent auditors conducted a SEDEX Members Ethical Trade Audit at our facilities. They determined that we met SEDEX’s requirements for acceptable labor standards. Our Brunswick plant was recognized beyond the audit for several environmental initiatives: self-generation of 30 percent of its electricity and 100 percent of its steam requirements from wood chips; water consumption reductions of an estimated 25 percent in 2014 and a further 35 percent in 2015; and an entrepreneurial venture that is expected to reduce waste going to landfill by over 85 percent in 2015.

Employee Relations

The integration of our businesses according to target markets has opened opportunities for employees to gain new experiences. Some members of our team are directly involved in a single business and have responsibilities dedicated to that area. Others have joined cross-business teams that allow for more cohesive interactions and enhanced performance through shared activities in various aspects of supply chain management, health, safety and environment (HSE), human resources and community relations.

 


G4-LA1

Total number and rates of new employee hires and employee turnover


New Hires

Age

<30

30-50

>50

Total

Male

3 (9.38%)

13 (40.63%)

9 (28.13%)

25 (78.13%)

Female

2 (6.25%)

5 (15.63%)

0

7 (21.88%)

Total

5 (15.63%)

18 (56.25%)

9 (28.13%)

32 (100%)

All new hires in the U.S.

Turnover Rates in U.S.*

Age

<30

30-50

>50

Male

0

6 (2.83%)

25 (11.79%)

Female

1 (0.47%)

0

4 (1.89%)

Total

1 (0.47%)

6 (2.83%)

29 (13.68%)

Turnover rates in Europe, Asia and South America were zero in 2014.


Occupational Health and Safety

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 16

Safety Momentum

Our “back to basics” safety focus in 2014 responded to the need to have employees fully understand the leading factors and their personal responsibilities in ensuring a safe workplace. We added specialized personnel to initiate and guide state-of-the-art best practice programs in occupational and process safety. Their efforts are supported by safety committees comprised of hourly and salaried employees at each location. The committees, which represent all employees, are responsible for the development and implementation of new health and safety initiatives, conducting monthly health, safety and environmental (HSE) audits, and having more frequent discussions of incidents, safety indicators and corrective actions.

The facility committees have been valuable contributors to our strategies and execution of action plans. Since they are hands-on participants in facility activities, the committees have been instrumental in personalizing worker engagement. In addition to identifying and correcting hazardous conditions encountered during audits, they remind co-workers of the need to observe and monitor themselves and those around them for alertness, equipment usage, chemical handling, workspace housekeeping and other influences on safety. The concept of sharing responsibility and looking out for each other is one we intend to expand in 2015.

The momentum of various programs launched in 2014 is building safety awareness at all levels. Programs include:

  • Working in the Red Zone, a program promoting vigilance when anyone is in a new situation or starting an unfamiliar task. The goal is to have people stop and think about safety before acting when they find themselves in a 'red zone'. We encourage greater communication and reporting of near miss situations so that we can be more proactive in conducting root cause analyses (RCAs) and avoiding incidents.
  • The Safety Library, an addition to our pre-shift huddle discussions. To ensure that a wide range of preventative safety issues are covered, we developed a library of topics and solutions spanning on – and off-site hazards. Library topics include hand hygiene, vehicle maintenance and operation, work in confined spaces, machine and hand tool safety, knife safety and use of personal protective gear.
  • Contractor Engagement, to step up their responsibility for safety. Each contractor work group is now handed a 'Contractor Observation and Injury Recording Report' form when entering our premises. It asks them to record at least one hazard, near miss or positive safety condition they observe each day. With their increased involvement, contractor recordable incidents declined from 3 in 2013 to 1 in 2014 and near miss reporting increased substantially.

 

We are implementing upgrades to our security systems and installing additional cameras at all plant entrances and perimeters. An enhanced safety tracking system will allow us to record observations as well as incidents so that we ensure risks are monitored, assessed and if appropriate, acted on.

Safety results varied by facility, and we are disappointed by the overall increase in incidents. Our Brunswick facility went through a number of operational changes which led to an atypically high incident rate. We believe that the Red Zone program helped keep up awareness and limit incidents during the transition period. To further protect employees at that facility and bring them to the standard of our other plants, we have plans to provide flame resistant uniforms in 2015. In contrast to Brunswick’s performance, our Colonels Island, Georgia plant completed 2014 with no Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recordable incidents.


G4-LA6

Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work‑related fatalities by region and by gender


Type of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism 2014

Employees

 

 

IR

ODR

LDR

Work-related Fatalities

Region

America

10.23

2.05

223.19

0

Gender

Male

9.21

2.05

217.05

0

 

Female

1.02

0

6.14

0

Independent Contractors

 

 

IR

ODR

LDR

Work-related Fatalities

Region

America

3.8

0

18.98

0

Gender

Male

3.8

0

18.98

0

 

Female

0

0

0

0

 

Pinova Holdings is governed by U.S. law as administered by the Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA). We follow any additional requirements of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Code not currently covered by OSHA regarding occupational injuries and diseases, lost days, and total number of work‑related fatalities.

TRIR
Employees = 2.46
Contractors = 0.76
2013 = 0.98

LTR (cause)
Employees = 0.82
Contractors = 0.76
2013 = 0.2

- - - - - - - -

Identified Omission(s) - Absenteeism rate
Reason(s) for Omission(s) - Currently unavailable
Explanation(s) for Omission(s) - Our technical systems do not have a feature that enables us to collect the information. Management will assess the feasibility of implementation over the next five years.


Training and Education

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 17, 20

Preventative Safety Training

There is no substitute for hands-on experience when it comes to being prepared for an emergency. That is why we conducted emergency preparedness training specific to the chemicals industry as well as to work and off‑site situations.

Preparedness Drill

In cooperation with the Jacksonville, Florida, Fire and Rescue Department we conducted an emergency drill for a “worst case” spill scenario. It included the rupture of a full tank, overflow of its contents beyond a dike wall and into a local waterway, and human injury.

Our response began with the establishment of an Incident Command Center, evacuation of all site personnel, and planning and execution of a reconnaissance rescue of an individual who had been overcome by vapors in a confined space. To contain the environmental impact on the water system, we deployed oil booms over a two mile radius around the facility. Everyone in the facility was involved and we are adjusting our procedures in any instance where our analysis showed a need for improvement.

Safe Vehicle Operation

Our forestry employees are frequent long distance drivers who inspect pine tree forests and stumps – a primary source for our raw materials – throughout the southeastern U.S. To help them and other employees who travel by car a great deal, we organized an intensive, day long driver-safety program. Participants practiced on a simulation automobile so they could apply their learnings that are applicable no matter when they are operating a vehicle.

Employee Relations

The integration of our businesses according to target markets has opened opportunities for employees to gain new experiences. Some members of our team are directly involved in a single business and have responsibilities dedicated to that area. Others have joined cross-business teams that allow for more cohesive interactions and enhanced performance through shared activities in various aspects of supply chain management, health, safety and environment (HSE), human resources and community relations.


G4-LA9

Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category


Total number of employees: 410
Average hours of training per year

Employment Type

 

Salary

Hourly

Non-Exempt

 

 

Male

106 hrs

119 hrs

120 hrs

 

 

Female

47 hrs

3 hrs

10 hrs

 

 


Diversity and Equal Opportunity

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 20

Employee Relations

The dynamics of our culture foster internal mobility as well as personal ownership and accountability. These characteristics are motivating points of differentiation in recruitment and retention. They were in evidence in 2014 as several employees shifted to responsibilities at different facilities and as front line operators were promoted to supervisory positions. Additional employee engagement activities included involvement of personnel in a Sensory Ingredients taste test panel, providing off-site leadership training to advance individual careers, and development of assessment material that can be used in performance reviews.

To further our employees’ health and wellness we are establishing smoke free environments at all our locations. We created committees representing a cross-section of employees at Jacksonville and Colonels Island to support program development in 2014 and implementation in 2015. The Northeast Florida Area Health Center is offering the Jacksonville location education and smoking cessation aids and the Glynn County Health Department of Brunswick, Georgia is providing the Colonels Island location with this benefit as well. The facility in Brunswick will become smoke free in 2016, the same year in which the Jacksonville and Colonels Island locations will go entirely tobacco free.


G4-LA12

Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category


All members of Pinova Holdings Inc.’s Board of directors are Caucasian men in their 40s–60s

 

Hourly

Salary

Non-Exempt

<30

4

2

13

30-50

120

50

24

>50

-

115

82

 

Hourly

Salary

Non-exempt

Male

117 (28.54%)

109 (26.59%)

112 (27.32%)

Female

7 (1.71%)

58 (14.15%)

7 (1.71%)


Society

(Sub-category)


Local Communities

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 21

With local leaders we are determining mutual goals and identifying ways to ensure that we have the most beneficial social impact on community stakeholders. We are committed to adhere to the American Chemistry Council’s Responsible Care Guiding Principles which demonstrates our concern for environmental and safety responsibility and monitoring.


G4-SO1

Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement,
impact assessments, and development programs


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Page 21

All our sites met their 2014 community acceptance goals which includes participate in and contributions to many charitable organizations.

Community Engagement

With local leaders we are determining mutual goals and identifying ways to ensure that we have the most beneficial social impact on community stakeholders. We are committed to adherence to the American Chemistry Council’s Responsible Care® Guiding Principles which demonstrates our concern for environmental and safety responsibility and monitoring. Any member of our community who has a question or concern can contact the local facility directly.

By centralizing the Community Relations function at the corporate level in 2014, we are well positioned to formalize our measurement of short – and long-term achievements. Our plan is to enhance engagement with the communities located in close proximity to our facilities. As we strive for full community acceptance, we are planning – in cooperation with area representatives – to establish assessment metrics that support what is needed to achieve the desired quality of life.


Anti-corruption

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


See answer to G4-SO4


G4-SO4

Percentage of employees trained in organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures


All employees receive the Code of Conduct when they initiate their employment, and ethics and anti‑corruption training.

 

US

Europe

Asia

Sth America

 

Hourly

124

-

-

-

 

Salary

160

5

1

1

 

Non-exempt

119

-

-

-

 


Product Responsibility

(Sub-category)


Customer Health and Safety

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 14, 21

RESPONSIBLE CARE® RC 14001 CERTIFICATION

Both of Pinova Holdings’ operating companies – Renessenz LLC and Pinova Inc. – were certified to the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care RC 14001 Certification in 2014. Representing another aspect of our commitment to quality, innovation, growth and sustainability, management of our operations in accordance with the Guiding Principles of Responsible Care adds value to customers as well as employees, the community, the environment and shareholders.

RC 14001 Responsible Care broadens the scope of the ISO 14001 standard beyond the traditional Environmental Management System to include health, safety, environmental, and security. All our facilities were dual certified to both RC 14001 and ISO 14001.


G4-PR2

Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services


None


Product and Service Labeling

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 14, 21

RESPONSIBLE CARE® RC 14001 CERTIFICATION

Both of Pinova Holdings’ operating companies – Renessenz LLC and Pinova Inc. – were certified to the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care RC 14001 Certification in 2014. Representing another aspect of our commitment to quality, innovation, growth and sustainability, management of our operations in accordance with the Guiding Principles of Responsible Care adds value to customers as well as employees, the community, the environment and shareholders.

RC 14001 Responsible Care broadens the scope of the ISO 14001 standard beyond the traditional Environmental Management System to include health, safety, environmental, and security. All our facilities were dual certified to both RC 14001 and ISO 14001.


G4-PR4

Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling


None


Marketing Communications

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 14, 21

RESPONSIBLE CARE® RC 14001 CERTIFICATION

Both of Pinova Holdings’ operating companies – Renessenz LLC and Pinova Inc. – were certified to the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care RC 14001 Certification in 2014. Representing another aspect of our commitment to quality, innovation, growth and sustainability, management of our operations in accordance with the Guiding Principles of Responsible Care adds value to customers as well as employees, the community, the environment and shareholders.

RC 14001 Responsible Care broadens the scope of the ISO 14001 standard beyond the traditional Environmental Management System to include health, safety, environmental, and security. All our facilities were dual certified to both RC 14001 and ISO 14001.


G4-PR7

Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications


None


Compliance

G4-DMA

Generic Disclosures on Management Approach


Corporate Stewardship 2014, Pages 14, 21

RESPONSIBLE CARE® RC 14001 CERTIFICATION

Both of Pinova Holdings’ operating companies – Renessenz LLC and Pinova Inc. – were certified to the American Chemistry Council Responsible Care RC 14001 Certification in 2014. Representing another aspect of our commitment to quality, innovation, growth and sustainability, management of our operations in accordance with the Guiding Principles of Responsible Care adds value to customers as well as employees, the community, the environment and shareholders.

RC 14001 Responsible Care broadens the scope of the ISO 14001 standard beyond the traditional Environmental Management System to include health, safety, environmental, and security. All our facilities were dual certified to both RC 14001 and ISO 14001.


G4-PR9

Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws
and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services


None